BeatGauge BPM Analyser For OSX Review

Beatgauge is a Mac-only app, and is available exclusively on the App Store; sorry PC guys. You’ll need to be on the at least this version of OSX (Yosemite 10.10), so if you haven’t updated yet you can’t use this. Having jumped both hurdles, Beatgauge itself is pretty easy to set up and use.

After downloading, you just launch the app itself, which is presented as a small window. With iTunes open, you can just drag songs and entire playlists from your library over to Beatgauge and, after a few seconds, the BPM of those tracks are calculated.

Your DJ software has built-in BPM detection (if it doesn’t, what software are you using!?), but what if you wanted to get the BPM of your tracks in iTunes? If you’re on a Mac and use iTunes as the hub of your music library organising, Beatgauge may be of interest.

Features:
– Very simple, intuitive user interface
– Quickly finds and analyzes songs without BPM
– Multi-threaded analysis that makes perfect use of multi-core processors
– Supports all local, unprotected iTunes audio file formats
– AppleScript API for power users

Notes:
– Requires OS X 10.10 or later
– Music files must be locally stored in iTunes and writable
– iCloud songs must be downloaded before analysis
– DRM protected songs cannot be analyzed
– State-of-the-art BPM detection is not 100% accurate—some values may be off by a factor of 2

For all you guys using iTunes and don’t want to bother opening DJ software just to get BPMs of songs (for example, you’re working on a remix or bootleg of a song in Ableton or other DAW), this might appeal to you, although I feel like it really is more for folks who need BPM detection but aren’t DJs such as fitness instructors and the like.

As a tool for getting track tempos, it does as its supposed to, simple and plain. DJs may consider this to be an unnecessary extra step in organising their libraries, especially since tempo analysis comes stock in practically any kind of pro DJ software available.
Again, Beatgauge seems to be more for the non-DJ type, or the DJ who likes to organise his library to the fullest possible without even reaching for a DJ app (if you’ve got separate libraries for casual listening and DJing, for instance). It’s also worth noting that Beatgauge writes tempo as iTunes metadata, and that’s something that DJ software doesn’t do.

Beatgauge may be a worthwhile add-on if you’re a Mac user and you use iTunes to organise your entire music library and create playlists. Alternately, Mixmeister has a similar tool called BPM Analyser, and costs half the price of Beatgauge with the added perk of being Windows-compatible. You may want to check that out instead if you’re a PC user.

You can find BeatGauge here


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